Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DOST

Dost think I can let thee go into a danger I do not partake?

Have I not confided to thee, and dost thou not desert me—nay, perhaps, betray?

How dost thou deceive them, and make them deceive themselves!

And dost thou in sooth find them in these hedges, good fellow?

Why, Tuck, dost thou not know of my ill happening with my father's steward?

Dost thou know, Albert Barnes, what I mean by that word, in the flesh?

And, among the rest, who dost thou think is to be her maid servant?

And now I mention that letter, why dost thou not wish me joy, Jack?

Hail, bounteous May, that dost inspire Mirth and youth and warm desire!

Or dost thou dread the billows' rage, Or tremble at the gale?

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English do, first person singular of Old English don "make, act, perform, cause; to put, to place," from West Germanic *don (cf. Old Saxon duan, Old Frisian dua, Dutch doen, Old High German tuon, German tun), from PIE root *dhe- "to put, place, do, make" (see factitious).

Use as an auxiliary began in Middle English. Periphrastic form in negative sentences ("They did not think") replaced the Old English negative particles ("Hie ne wendon"). Slang meaning "to do the sex act with or to" is from 1913. Expression do or die is attested from 1620s. Cf. does, did, done.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.