Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR COURSES

We can turn rivers in their courses, level mountains to the plains.

But the sun already is low in the west, and there will scarce be light for these courses.

It is said he delivered seventy courses of medical lectures.

And what was it but want that drove them to both of these courses?

He felt a little gloomy while the courses went on, and wished he had an evening paper.

My mind was full of my father's plans and of the courses which lay before me.

The main idea in all courses was to do what you had to but no more.

Only a few of our officers had gone the round of "schools of instruction" and "courses."

All the courses in Teachers College are open to men and women.

He finds Assyria and the Mounds of Cholula at his door, and himself has laid the courses.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., "onward movement," from Old French cors (12c.) "course; run, running; flow of a river," from Latin cursus "a running race or course," from curs- past participle stem of currere "to run" (see current (adj.)).

Most extended senses (meals, etc.) are present in 14c. Academic meaning "planned series of study" is c.1600 (in French from 14c.). Phrase of course is attested from 1540s; literally "of the ordinary course;" earlier in same sense was bi cours (c.1300).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.