Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STRETCH

Mesopotamia, therefore, meant a stretch of land "between the rivers."

So this part of my restraint was doubtless a stretch of the authority given him.

If he were allowed to stretch out after the mare, what would the result be?

It seemed almost too great a stretch for even her imagination.

You were arrested in Buffalo, convicted, and served your stretch.

Stretch yourself full-length in this arm-chair, and pretend to be dead.

Halfway up the stretch Allis was riding stirrup to stirrup with her father.

He'll win the race in the stretch, an' there won't be many there to bother—they'll all be beat off.

Dat's where our horse gits it; he's a stretch runner, he is.

Hubert was preparing to stretch some material on another frame.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English streccan, from Proto-Germanic *strakjanan (cf. Danish strække, Swedish sträcka, Old Frisian strekka, Old High German strecchan, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch, Old High German, German strecken "to stretch"), perhaps a variant of the root of stark, or else from PIE root *strenk- "tight, narrow; pull tight, twist" (see strain).

Meaning "to extend (the limbs or wings)" is from c.1200; that of "to lay out for burial" is from early 13c. To stretch one's legs "take a walk" is from c.1600. Meaning "to lengthen by force" first recorded late 14c.; figurative sense of "to enlarge beyond proper limits, exaggerate," is from 1550s. Stretch limo first attested 1973. Stretch marks is attested from 1960. Stretcher "canvas frame for carrying the sick or wounded" is first attested 1845.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STRETCH

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.