protraction

[ proh-trak-shuh n, pruh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF protraction
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PROTRACTION

The protraction of the war was beginning to try the endurance of the nation.

The problem can be worked out, either by calculation or by protraction.

It was a protraction only of what is worst in life; it was in no way a completion of what is best in it.

It soon became evident that human endurance would be insufficient to bear any protraction of the obsequies.

It would only be a protraction of my misery—a few hours more of wretched existence—for certainly I must meet death by hunger.

The old man evidently thought with his sister, that his bed had something to do with the protraction of his life.

This, my Lords, is the kind of damage which he has suffered by the want of witnesses, through the protraction of this trial.

The only great dread is the protraction of life into imbecility or the visitation of lingering pain.

Some very extraordinary instances are related of the protraction of life in snails.

I lament the protraction of your father's illness very much, for your mother's sake, and all your sakes.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-15c., "drawing or writing of numbers," from Middle French protraction (15c.) and directly from Late Latin protractionem (nominative protractio) "a drawing out or lengthening," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin protrahere "to draw forward, draw out, bring forth;" figuratively "bring to light, reveal, expose," from pro- "forward" (see pro-) + trahere "to draw" (see tract (n.1)). Meaning "act of drawing out or prolonging" is from 1530s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PROTRACTION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.