proliferation

[ pruh-lif-uh-rey-shuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF proliferation

Synonyms for proliferation

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PROLIFERATION

The 70s witnessed a proliferation of multilateral assistance programs.

This phenomenon is known as proliferation of the floral axis.

And the proliferation of prisons, however necessary, is no substitute for hope and order in our souls.

That cells, still retaining the same nature, increase by self-division or proliferation, is admitted by almost every one.

That the chieftaincy was neither inherited nor permanent is indicated by the proliferation of chiefs' names in historical sources.

The science treats of a balanced system rather than of a proliferation.

A proliferation of tools allowed for increased productivity in those remote times of the inception of language.

Increase in size following emergence from hibernation may be due in part to proliferation of the sustentacular cytoplasm.

This is due to the proliferation of the cells in the anterior capsule of the lens while attempting to lay down new lens fibres.

But where did that place his theory on darkness and a correlation with the heightened noise's proliferation?

WORD ORIGIN

1859, "formation or development of cells," from French prolifération, from prolifère "producing offspring," from Latin proles "offspring" (see prolific) + ferre "to bear" (see infer). Meaning "enlargement, extension, increase" is from 1920; especially of nuclear weapons (1966).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PROLIFERATION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.