synonyms
  • definitions

amplifies

[ am-pluh-fahy ]SEE DEFINITION OF amplifies

Synonyms for amplifies

  • augment
  • deepen
  • exaggerate
  • heighten
  • intensify
  • magnify
  • strengthen
  • add
  • boost
  • develop
  • elaborate
  • enlarge
  • expand
  • expatiate
  • extend
  • inflate
  • lengthen
  • pad
  • pyramid
  • raise
  • stretch
  • supplement
  • swell
  • up
  • widen
  • beef up
  • build up
  • flesh out
  • hike up
  • jack up
  • soup up
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Antonyms for amplifies

  • decrease
  • play down
  • weaken
  • abbreviate
  • abridge
  • compress
  • concentrate
  • condense
  • contract
  • curtail
  • cut
  • diminish
  • halt
  • lessen
  • lower
  • narrow
  • reduce
  • repress
  • shorten
  • shrink
  • simplify
  • stop
  • subtract
  • summarize
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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR AMPLIFIES

Space also it amplifies, by degrees that are sometimes terrific.

His awkwardness spreads and sprouts and amplifies and ramifies.

Space also it amplifies by degrees that are sometimes terrific.

This truth, which amplifies the lecture, is addressed to the eye.

From his own sources of information he confirms and amplifies all that the English and Americans have asserted.

He defines (page xc) and further on amplifies his definition that creation means "a process he knows not what."

Throughout his metaphysical speculations Galen reproduces and amplifies the Hippocratic dogmatism.

Occasionally he amplifies and unfolds an idea, as in the essays already mentioned, but generally his argument is a rope of sand.

For the man puts his whole heart in the story, and alters, amplifies, explains away till his heart is satisfied.

He came down, &c.' Miss Robinson, twenty-five years later, amplifies the story.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "to enlarge or expand," from Middle French amplifier, from Latin amplificare "to enlarge," from amplificus "splendid," from amplus "large" (see ample) + the root of facere "make, do" (see factitious). Meaning "augment in volume or amount" is from 1570s. Restriction of use to sound seems to have emerged in the electronic age, c.1915, in reference to radio technology.