lacerate

[ verb las-uh-reyt; adjective las-uh-reyt, -er-it ]SEE DEFINITION OF lacerate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LACERATE

I forgot to lacerate your beaver hats, but that is soon done.

These spurs do not lacerate the horse, as their points are blunt.

Is there now some “thorn in the flesh” sent to lacerate thee?

And he kept drifting about to find Becky and lacerate her with the performance.

The power of individuals to lacerate their fellow-creatures is given to them by the community.

There remain, and always will remain, more than enough to lacerate and kill him.

They lacerate their bodies, but do not extract the front teeth.

Calyptra minute, lacerate, persistent at the base of the capsule.

A man—I use the word in its fullest sense—does not wish to lacerate his foe, however earnestly he may desire his life.

Zoe trotted away with her head up, carrying the kitten very carefully lest her teeth should lacerate its tender skin.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., from Latin laceratus, past participle of lacerare "tear to pieces, mangle," figuratively, "to slander, censure, abuse," from lacer "torn, mangled," from PIE root *lek- "to rend, tear" (cf. Greek lakis "tatter, rag," lakizein "to tear to pieces;" Russian lochma "rag, tatter, scrap;" Albanian l'akur "naked"). Related: Lacerated; lacerating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LACERATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.