Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BITE

The russet of oranges is caused by the bite of an insect on the skin.

Stopping for a bite to eat in the kitchen, Linda went back to her room.

She could scratch, kick, and bite—and stab too; but for stabbing she wanted a knife.

Procinus, however, was spared to die of the bite of a viper.

Won't you stop for a bite and fresh water with friends of the cause?

Now you come in, an' I'll git you a bite o' somethin' t'eat.

They scowled at him as if they were mad enough to bite off the heads of tenpenny nails.

Grant isn't going to bite you, and you're not afraid of him.

He could only bite his nails and puff away to the next Defaulter.

You make one bite your head off, when one wants to be soothing beyond everything.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bitan (class I strong verb; past tense bat, past participle biten), from Proto-Germanic *bitan (cf. Old Saxon bitan, Old Norse and Old Frisian bita, Middle Dutch biten, Dutch bijten, German beissen, Gothic beitan "to bite"), from PIE root *bheid- "to split, crack" (see fissure).

To bite the bullet is said to be 1700s military slang, from old medical custom of having the patient bite a lead bullet during an operation to divert attention from pain and reduce screaming. Figurative use from 1891; the custom itself attested from 1840s. To bite (one's) tongue "refrain from speaking" is 1590s. To bite the dust "die" is 1750 (Latin had the same image; cf. Virgil: procubuit moriens et humum semel ore momordit). To bite off more than one can chew (c.1880) is U.S. slang, from plug tobacco.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BITE

advance

nounmoney given beforehand
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.