Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FROZE

If the ice that froze up the spring of his love would but begin to melt!

I guess that hoss thinks he's goin' to be froze to the ground.

As soon as the Prairie-dog sat up with some food in his hand she froze into a statue.

Johnsons hands had hardy touched it before it froze immediately.

One winter, the ground was covered with snow, and it froze horribly.

He burst into a passion of weeping; as the tears fell they froze upon his face.

I know there's somethin' and I've froze to death by sections waitin' to hear it.

Don't you suppose I know I look as stiff and awkward as if I'd froze?

They've got too much of that stock to let themselves be froze out.

The smile with which he had been ready to greet Galeotto froze slightly at sight of me.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English freosan "turn to ice" (class II strong verb; past tense freas, past participle froren), from Proto-Germanic *freusanan (cf. Old Norse frjosa, Old High German friosan, German frieren "to freeze," Gothic frius "frost"), from Proto-Germanic *freus-, equivalent to PIE root *preus- "to freeze," also "to burn" (cf. Sanskrit prusva, Latin pruina "hoarfrost," Welsh rhew "frost," Sanskrit prustah "burnt," Albanian prus "burning coals," Latin pruna "a live coal").

Transitive sense first recorded 14c., figurative sense c.1400. Meaning "become rigid or motionless" attested by 1720. Sense of "fix at a certain level, make non-transactable" is 1922. Freeze frame is from 1960, originally "a briefly Frozen Shot after the Jingle to allow ample time for Change over at the end of a T.V. 'Commercial.' " ["ABC of Film & TV," 1960].

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.