Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SINCEREST

He was physician to Madame de Pompadour, and one of the sincerest and most single-hearted of men probably in Paris at the time.

The sincerest of women will make no unnecessary confidences to a man.

This can only be done by a writer of feeling, of imagination, and of the sincerest art.

Is not this the sincerest yet rudest voice of the spirit of man?

I beseech you to tell me all, trusting in me for my sincerest sympathy.

We can never think of you without the sincerest, fondest love.

But because of friendship,—the deepest, sincerest of my whole life.

I dedicate this Romance of Friendship to you with the sincerest pleasure and affection.

Then I poured forth all the thoughts that the sincerest passion could suggest.

This letter she wrote, sentence by sentence, as if from her deepest, sincerest heart.

WORD ORIGIN

1530s, "pure, unmixed," from Middle French sincere (16c.), from Latin sincerus, of things, "whole, clean, pure, uninjured, unmixed," figuratively "sound, genuine, pure, true, candid, truthful," of uncertain origin. Ground sense seems to be "that which is not falsified." Meaning "free from pretense or falsehood" in English is from 1530s.

There has been a temptation to see the first element as Latin sine "without." But there is no etymological justification for the common story that the word means "without wax" (*sin cerae), which is dismissed out of hand by OED and others, and the stories invented to justify that folk etymology are even less plausible. Watkins has it as originally "of one growth" (i.e. "not hybrid, unmixed"), from PIE *sm-ke-ro-, from *sem- "one" (see same) + root of crescere "to grow" (see crescent).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.