synonyms
  • definitions

regular

[ reg-yuh-ler ]SEE DEFINITION OF regular
  • adj.normal, common
  • adj.orderly, consistent, balanced

Synonyms for regular

  • daily
  • everyday
  • formal
  • legitimate
  • ordinary
  • proper
  • routine
  • traditional
  • typical
  • usual
  • classic
  • commonplace
  • general
  • natural
  • official
  • standard
  • approved
  • bona fide
  • correct
  • customary
  • established
  • habitual
  • lawful
  • orthodox
  • prevailing
  • prevalent
  • run-of-the-mill
  • sanctioned
  • time-honored
  • typic
  • unexceptional
  • unvarying
MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for regular

  • abnormal
  • atypical
  • different
  • irregular
  • special
  • uncommon
  • unconventional
  • untraditional
  • unusual
  • exceptional
  • rare
  • anomalous
  • changing
  • disorderly
  • eccentric
  • extraordinary
  • imbalanced
  • inconsistent
  • infrequent
  • unsteady
  • variable
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REGULAR

It will not even be a regular history in the accepted sense of the word.

It was one of the regular delights of the household to see them bathe.

The stairway was very narrow, and formed a regular spiral as in a turret.

For the remainder of that day, poor George was in a regular whirl of excitement.

The sungar was a regular trap, and the company were ordered to retire.

The bayonets glisten in a regular line of blue-white points.

"Well, it's a regular Napoleon hat," exclaimed the Colonel, much pleased.

"We're going to have a regular little tea-party," said the Colonel.

I daresay she's right, old chap, only I'd like to be regular myself.

The next spring he hired me regular and give me wages every month.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Old French reguler "ecclesiastical" (Modern French r*#233;gulier), from Late Latin regularis "containing rules for guidance," from Latin regula "rule," from PIE *reg- "move in a straight line" (see regal).

Earliest sense was of religious orders (the opposite of secular). Extended from late 16c. to shapes, etc., that followed predictable or uniform patterns; sense of "normal" is from 1630s; meaning "real, genuine" is from 1821. Old English borrowed Latin regula and nativized it as regol "rule, regulation, canon, law, standard, pattern;" hence regolsticca "ruler" (instrument); regollic (adj.) "canonical, regular."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR REGULAR

accepted

adjectivegenerally agreed upon
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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