conjugate

[ verb kon-juh-geyt; adjective, noun kon-juh-git, -geyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF conjugate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONJUGATE

Conjugate: to bring together in pairs: consisting of a single pair.

As to you, 'new boy,' you will conjugate 'ridiculus sum' twenty times.

I will not spare you,” said I; “this evening I intend to make you conjugate an Armenian verb.

Thirsting to be amused, he could not conjugate the active verb "to amuse."

Even Murray can only afford to conjugate one example,—To Love.

It will be convenient to say that this line and the plane are conjugate with each other.

Maddy knew well what "conjugate" meant, but that verb Amo, what could it mean?

These lines a and a′ are said to be conjugate with regard to the surface.

If every diameter is perpendicular to its conjugate the conic is a circle.

The Anglo-Saxon man wants him to learn to conjugate and wear suspenders.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s, in grammatical sense; 1560s in literal sense, from Latin coniugatus, past participle of coniugare "to yoke together" (see conjugal). Earlier as an adjective (late 15c.). Related: Conjugated; conjugating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONJUGATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.