Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR THINK UP

He supposed he must think up something to daub on there—the poorer the better.

Well, no use, Cap'n, I've got to think up some notion to keep him from comin' here.

He surprised himself with all the good times he was able to think up.

You must get away—somewhere—for just now, till we can think up something to do.

Keep him there till he weakens an' quits, or till I can think up some plan further.

The best alibi I can think up is that I did it offhand and casual.

Anyhow it's hard to guess the answer, so I'll think up one that's easier.

"I'll have to think up some sort of a scenario to go with it," the manager said.

Personally, I like it less even than the other, but it's the only one I've been able to think up.

If you don't want to do something, it's easy enough to think up reasons.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English þencan "conceive in the mind, think, consider, intend" (past tense þohte, p.p. geþoht), probably originally "cause to appear to oneself," from Proto-Germanic *thankjan (cf. Old Frisian thinka, Old Saxon thenkian, Old High German denchen, German denken, Old Norse þekkja, Gothic þagkjan); Old English þencan is the causative form of the distinct Old English verb þyncan "to seem or appear" (past tense þuhte, past participle geþuht), from Proto-Germanic *thunkjan (cf. German dünken, däuchte). Both are from PIE *tong- "to think, feel" which also is the root of thought and thank. The two meanings converged in Middle English and þyncan "to seem" was absorbed, except for archaic methinks "it seems to me." Jocular past participle thunk (not historical, but by analogy of drink, sink, etc.) is recorded from 1876.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR THINK UP

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.