Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SAND

The sides of this hill he covered with a layer of bricks that the sand might not be blown away.

We could not find any of his camps, however; doubtless the sand has long since covered them.

But it was not to be drifted up with the sand of forgetfulness!

But they saw that the sea was for the swimmer, and the sand for the feet of the runner.

Yates caught up a handful of sand, and flung it lightly against the pane.

Linda laid her palm on the top of the sand heap and pressed it flat.

She gnashed her white tusks, and dug into the sand with her brazen claws.

Tramping on in the sand isn't as bad as it might be, either, when one gets used to it.

A soft, sliding hillock of sand lay directly in front of them.

He drew the cane out of the sand, thrusting the stick down in its stead.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sand, from Proto-Germanic *sandam (cf. Old Norse sandr, Old Frisian sond, Middle Dutch sant, Dutch zand, German Sand), from PIE *bhs-amadho- (cf. Greek psammos "sand;" Latin sabulum "coarse sand," source of Italian sabbia, French sable), suffixed form of root *bhes- "to rub."

Historically, the line between sand and gravel cannot be distinctly drawn. Used figuratively in Old English in reference to innumerability and instability. General Germanic, but not attested in Gothic, which used in this sense malma, related to Old High German melm "dust," the first element of the Swedish city name Malmö (the second element meaning "island"), and to Latin molere "to grind." Metaphoric for "innumerability" since Old English. Sand dollar, type of flat sea-urchin, so called from 1884, so called for its shape; sand dune attested from 1830.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SAND

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.