ivory

[ ahy-vuh-ree, ahy-vree ]SEE DEFINITION OF ivory
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR IVORY

There is a kind of beauty that seems made to be painted on ivory, and such was hers.

Her ivory forehead was wrinkled charmingly in a little frown of obstinacy.

The first evening they talked of the wonder of the ivory stockade.

There he made the gold and ivory statue of Zeus that you shall see in Zeus's temple.

There was Ivory Brown's funeral: how would that have gone on if it hadn't been for her?

Young men like John don't take to ivory hands a pinting, for nothing.

Gone were the figs and almonds, the indigo, ivory, tortoise shells.

Ivory from Zanzibar, salt from Cadiz and wines from Bordeaux.

They were constructed of ivory and jet, and their capitals were overlaid with the purest gold.

It had two keyboards, tortoise-shell naturals and ivory sharps.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-13c. (late 12c. as a surname), Anglo-French ivorie, from Old North French ivurie (12c.), from Latin eboreus "of ivory," from ebur (genitive eboris) "ivory," probably via Phoenician from an African source (cf. Egyptian ab "elephant," Coptic ebu "ivory"). Replaced Old English elpendban, literally "elephant bone." Applied in slang to articles made from it, such as dice (1830) and piano keys (1854). As a color, especially in reference to human skin, it is attested from 1580s. Ivories as slang for "teeth" dates from 1782. Related: Ivoried.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR IVORY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.