alabaster

[ al-uh-bas-ter, -bah-ster ]SEE DEFINITION OF alabaster

Synonyms for alabaster

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Antonyms for alabaster

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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ALABASTER

I have a little heathen god—Gautama; alabaster—and a mummied cat.

If by any accident, marble or alabaster happen to be broken, it may be strongly cemented together in the following manner.

The head of the magistrate was half hidden by the paper, his brow was like alabaster.

At one end there will be sure to be the image of the teacher, wrought in alabaster.

A lovely figure, as white and almost as clear as alabaster, was lying on the bed.

Come and wash in the fountains that fall into the basins of crystal and alabaster.

Tancred rushed to her side; she was quite insensible, and pale as alabaster.

At the head stood an alabaster vase (X, 31) of a late Neolithic shape.

I should be in the Alabaster Hall, waiting till Charmion came forth.

Dost forget how nigh thou wast to death there in the Alabaster Hall?

WORD ORIGIN

translucent whitish kind of gypsum used for vases, ornaments, and busts, late 14c., from Old French alabastre (12c., Modern French albâtre), from Latin alabaster "colored rock used to make boxes and vessels for unguents," from Greek alabastros (earlier albatos) "vase for perfumes," perhaps from Egyptian 'a-labaste "vessel of the goddess Bast." Used figuratively for whiteness and smoothness from 1570s. "The spelling in 16-17th c. is almost always alablaster ..." [OED].

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ALABASTER

marble

adjectiveof or like marble
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.