Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TAR

The tar and feather proposal seemed to meet with general favor.

The salts and more active spirits of tar are got by infusion in cold water; but the resinous part is not to be dissolved thereby.

Tar water is strongly recommended, and also the smoking of the dried leaves of stramonium, commonly called the thorn-apple.

Brown paper should never be used with baked dishes; the pitch and tar which it contains will give the meat a smoky bad taste.

"I wonder when they'll learn wisdom and tar the roads," was his comment.

And this thing began to flow along the rods, much as tar flows.

And with that the wolf fell upon him and tried to tear the tar off.

Oh,” said the wolf, “I need some tar to smear my coat so that the dogs cannot catch me.

Oh,” said the fox, “I need some tar to smear my coat so that the dogs cannot catch me.

The fox put up his paws to take the tar, and his paws stuck fast.

WORD ORIGIN

a viscous liquid, Old English teoru, teru, literally "the pitch of (certain kinds of) trees," from Proto-Germanic *terwo- (cf. Old Norse tjara, Old Frisian tera, Middle Dutch tar, Dutch teer, German Teer), probably a derivation of *trewo-, from PIE *drew- "tree" (cf. Sanskrit daru "wood;" Lithuanian darva "pine wood;" Greek dory "beam, shaft of a spear," drys "tree, oak;" Gothic triu, Old English treow "tree;" see tree).

Tar baby is from an 1881 "Uncle Remus" story by Joel Chandler Harris. Tarheel for "North Carolina resident" first recorded 1864, probably from the gummy resin of pine woods. Tar water, an infusion of tar in cold water, was popular as a remedy from c.1740 through late 18c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TAR

cement

noungluing, binding material
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.