Synonyms for smoke

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SMOKE

And now, Uncle Paul, if you don't object I'll take out my pipe and have a smoke.

She had boasted to him once of having learned to smoke at school.

He tossed them onto the table, and Hal Dozier rolled his smoke in silence.

As I eat my breakfast and smoke my pipe, I ponder over my task.

And now they all vanish in a puff of smoke from the chimney.

"There is the smoke from Bazas, on the further side of Garonne," quoth he.

He whirled about in his swivel chair, and blew a cloud of smoke from his mouth.

Yesterday morning they were at Cowes, and we saw the smoke from the burning crofts.

The smoke rolled up as usual, and the report was equally gratifying.

Chip took the cigarette from his lips and emptied his lungs of smoke.

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English smoca (rare) "fumes and volatile material given off by burning substances," related to smeocan "give off smoke," from Proto-Germanic *smuk- (cf. Middle Dutch smooc, Dutch smook, Middle High German smouch, German Schmauch), from PIE root *smeug- "to smoke; smoke" (cf. Armenian mux "smoke," Greek smykhein "to burn with smoldering flame," Old Irish much, Welsh mwg "smoke").

The more usual noun was Old English smec, which became dialectal smeech. Abusive meaning "black person" attested from 1913, American English. Smoke-eater "firefighter" is c.1930. Figurative phrase go up in smoke "be destroyed" (as if by fire) is from 1933. Smoke alarm first attested 1936; smoke-detector from 1957.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SMOKE

alcohol

nounintoxicating, flammable liquid
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.