Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STONES

This afternoon I took a round of angles and bearings from a pile of stones on the hill.

No stones or other missiles were used; the battle was fist to fist.

We could follow the blood-drops for a long way over the stones.

So it is almost with a shudder I take my last look at the Stones of Carnac.

I was too far to hear him, but the people broke out with a shower of sticks and stones.

I couldn't have supposed that in my presence people would be stocks and stones!

Why in this world are you talking about stones and sage and greasewood?

Remember my orders: stones in your pockets, the stick in your hand.

"Sticks an' stones'll break my bones, but names'll never hurt me," he quoted at her.

He lay as still as the stones beside him, and all was quiet again in the twilight.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English stan, used of common rocks, precious gems, concretions in the body, memorial stones, from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (cf. Old Norse steinn, Danish steen, Old High German and German stein, Gothic stains), from PIE *stai- "stone," also "to thicken, stiffen" (cf. Sanskrit styayate "curdles, becomes hard;" Avestan stay- "heap;" Greek stear "fat, tallow," stia, stion "pebble;" Old Church Slavonic stena "wall").

Slang sense of "testicle" is from mid-12c. The British measure of weight (usually equal to 14 pounds) is from late 14c., originally a specific stone. Stone's throw for "a short distance" is attested from 1580s. Stone Age is from 1864. To kill two birds with one stone is first attested 1650s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STONES

carbuncle

nounabscess
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.