Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BRONZE

There were bronze chariots with horses of bronze to draw them and men of bronze to hold the reins.

Bronze lampholder: Five lamps hung from the branches of this bronze tree.

Felix, in gratitude, had this portrait of his master cast in bronze.

Then the artist took a separate sheet of bronze for his design.

These piles were stems, or trunks of trees, sharpened with stone or bronze tools.

Only he can be trusted with gifts who can present a face of bronze to expectations.

The furnace was filled with pieces of brass and bronze, and the fire was lit.

Crowning all is to be a group in bronze symbolical of Discovery.

She was naked and shivered in the cold night air—a slender statue of bronze.

He held out to her in his two hands a little kicking image of bronze.

WORD ORIGIN

1721, "alloy of copper and tin," from French bronze, from Italian bronzo, from Medieval Latin bronzium. Perhaps cognate (via notion of color) with Venetian bronza "glowing coals," or German brunst "fire." Perhaps influenced by Latin Brundisium the Italian town of Brindisi (Pliny writes of aes Brundusinum). Perhaps ultimately from Persian birinj "copper."

In Middle English, the distinction between bronze (copper-tin alloy) and brass (copper-zinc alloy) was not clear, and both were called bras. A bronze medal was given to a third-place finisher since at least 1852. The archaeological Bronze Age (1865) falls between the Stone and Iron ages, and is a reference to the principal material for making weapons and ornaments.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BRONZE

brown

adjectivedark, burnished color
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.