Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PROROGUE

The sovereign had never dared to prorogue them against their will, they argued.

This view of q bears upon the theory of words like prorogue, &c.

The Governor had the right to summon, to prorogue, and to dissolve the Assembly.

If the assemblies took notice of it, they were to prorogue or dissolve them.

The King has the veto power and the power to prorogue parliament.

On the 9th of May, the king went down to prorogue parliament.

The British monarch may prorogue or even dissolve the Parliament.

As long as her Majesty continued to open and prorogue Parliament in person the same perfection of delivery was always noticed.

It was almost an insult for him to prorogue the Assembly on his own authority and without their knowledge.

His Ministry advised him to prorogue Parliament, and prorogued it accordingly was.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "to prolong, extend," from Old French proroger, proroguer (14c.), from Latin prorogare, literally "to ask publicly," from pro "before" (see pro-) + rogare "to ask" (see rogation). Perhaps the original sense in Latin was "to ask for public assent to extending someone's term in office." Legislative meaning "discontinue temporarily" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Prorogation.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PROROGUE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.