Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FALL AWAY

All the agitation and turmoil of the last few months seemed to fall away from him.

But suddenly, at a point where it fringed a meadow, it seemed to fall away.

Perhaps she was so, and only the pains of death made her seem to fall away.

His interest in her began to grow, his reserve to fall away.

They fitted him no longer; they began to fall away from him.

If you follow his advice the difficulties will fall away, because he wants the railway.

Condescend, noble Piso, to name me to her, and entreat her not to fall away from her Greek.

Mind that you do not fall away from the ball when the club is about to come into contact with it.

See them in their true light and their power will fall away from them.

We speak as man to man, and I know you are not likely to fall away from me.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English feallan (class VII strong verb; past tense feoll, past participle feallen) "to fall; fail, decay, die," from Proto-Germanic *fallanan (cf. Old Frisian falla, Old Saxon fallan, Dutch vallen, Old Norse falla, Old High German fallan, German fallen), from PIE root *pol- "to fall" (cf. Armenian p'ul "downfall," Lithuanian puola "to fall," Old Prussian aupallai "finds," literally "falls upon").

Most of the figurative senses had developed in Middle English. Meaning "to be reduced" (as temperature) is from 1650s. To fall in love is attested from 1520s; to fall asleep is late 14c. Fall through "come to naught" is from 1781. To fall for something is from 1903.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FALL AWAY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.