Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MELT

If the ice that froze up the spring of his love would but begin to melt!

I'm fit to melt—there is no strength left in me; here, come and take the rod!'

Put some butter into a sauce-pan, set it on hot coals, and melt and skim it.

Put the sugar to melt in the liquid, and let it set all night.

Melt a pound of butter by putting it into a skillet on hot coals.

Melt a quarter of a pound of fresh butter in a quart of milk.

Upon my word of honour, I do believe it must melt at times; it vanishes so quickly.

The water which serves to melt and separate the wax is far from being useless.

So that he adds, upon the empty city, 'Burn it and melt its brass'.

I did not awake; things did not melt away in a mist before my eyes.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English meltan "become liquid, consume by fire, burn up" (class III strong verb; past tense mealt, past participle molten), from Proto-Germanic *meltanan; fused with Old English gemæltan (Anglian), gemyltan (West Saxon) "make liquid," from Proto-Germanic *gamaltijanan (cf. Old Norse melta "to digest"), both from PIE *meldh-, (cf. Sanskrit mrduh "soft, mild," Greek meldein "to melt, make liquid," Latin mollis "soft, mild"), from root *mel- "soft," with derivatives referring to soft or softened (especially ground) materials (see mild). Figurative use by c.1200. Related: Melted; melting.

Of food, to melt in (one's) mouth is from 1690s. Melting pot is from 1540s; figurative use from 1855; popularized with reference to America by play "The Melting Pot" by Israel Zangwill (1908).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MELT

broil

verbcook under direct heat
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.