Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCORCHES

It is the torrid zone that scorches the face, and tobacco the gun-powder that blows it up.

The sun is hot all the second day, and scorches us in the dry defile.

A steamship might be propelled by the heat that scorches its decks.

If it scorches it is too hot for use, wait for a few minutes to cool.

My solitude now is like rotten fruit; it scorches my entrails like a fiery drink.

The poetry of the first scorches, that of the last scarcely warms.

The flame that sweeps our prairies is terrible, but it only scorches the surface.

He hath a contempt for women that scorches, and to hurt them--but 'tis not this I would say.

When the vegetables are very brown (great care must be taken not to burn the onion, which scorches very easily) add ½ lb.

He touches his skin with a red-hot iron; the skin smokes and scorches, but the sleeper does not awake.

WORD ORIGIN

"to burn superficially or slightly, but so as to change the color or injure the texture," early 14c., perhaps an alteration of scorrcnenn "make dry, parch" (c.1200), of obscure origin, perhaps from Old Norse skorpna "to be shriveled," cognate with Old English scrimman "to shrink, dry up." Or perhaps from Old French escorchier "to strip off the skin," from Vulgar Latin excorticare "to flay," from ex- (see ex-) + Latin cortex (genitive corticis) "cork;" but OED finds this not likely. Scorched earth military strategy is 1937, translation of Chinese jiaotu, used against the Japanese in a bid to stem their advance into China.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.