Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCURVY

That's a scurvy welcome to give a nephew you haven't seen for eighteen years.

But what are you to do when the boys clear out, and—and play you such a scurvy trick?

Salt meat is not so easily digested as fresh provisions, and has a tendency to produce putrid diseases, especially the scurvy.

Isn't there danger of scurvy if we have nothing but salt pork to eat?

I asked shocked, “who would think of such a scurvy trick, sir?”

She had been under my care three years before for sailor's scurvy.

Handel thought the orchestra was just playing him a scurvy trick.

Half the crew of seventy-seven perish of starvation and scurvy.

The Resolution had only three men on the sick-list, and but one of these had the scurvy.

In the middle of summer many of his crew were attacked by scurvy.

WORD ORIGIN

1560s, noun use of adjective scurvy "covered with scabs, diseased, scorbutic" (early 15c.), variant of scurfy. It took on the narrower meaning of Dutch scheurbuik, French scorbut "scurvy," in reference to the disease characterized by swollen and bleeding gums, prostration, etc., perhaps from Old Norse skyrbjugr, which is perhaps literally "a swelling (bjugr) from drinking sour milk (skyr) on long sea voyages;" but OED has alternative etymology of Middle Dutch or Middle Low German origin, as "disease that lacerates the belly," from schoren "to lacerate" + Middle Low German buk, Dutch buik "belly."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SCURVY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.