Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MOVING

He was moving leisurely, keeping his horse at the cattle pony's lope.

Firing from ambush and moving from place to place, he would seem more than one man.

A phantom of him moving silent about the house fill the part as well!

When he stood behind her, silent and not moving, she turned slowly about and faced him.

Sidney could hear her moving about with flat, inelastic steps.

Moving from enclosure to enclosure of box, she came, before she knew it, to the house itself.

For at first she only perceived that a dim shadow was moving under the moonlight.

In the other case the moving and steering was done by turning a peg.

Of course this could be prevented by moving the camp out of range of this hill.

He could hear Cazi Moto moving about, arranging clothes and equipment.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., from Anglo-French mover, Old French movoir "to move, get moving, set out; set in motion; introduce" (Modern French mouvoir), from Latin movere "move, set in motion; remove; disturb" (past participle motus, frequentative motare), from PIE root *meue- "to push away" (cf. Sanskrit kama-muta "moved by love" and probably mivati "pushes, moves;" Lithuanian mauti "push on;" Greek ameusasthai "to surpass," amyno "push away").

Intransitive sense developed in Old French and came thence to English, though it now is rare in French. Meaning "to affect with emotion" is from c.1300; that of "to prompt or impel toward some action" is from late 14c. Sense of "to change one's place of residence" is from 1707. Meaning "to propose (something) in an assembly, etc.," is first attested mid-15c. Related: Moved; moving.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MOVING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.