Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TIGHT

His grasp did not bruise, it did not seem to be tight; but the hand that held it was immovable.

Linda suddenly gathered her friend in her arms and held her tight.

You never know what hold you really have until you get in a tight place.

Screwed the top on tight, which would make the connection, and then forgot the time.

We were both down, with our faces in the snow, and I held him tight.

An' Laura waits for me an' tells me to be sure to get 'em on tight enough,—why, bless me!

In climbed the giant,--he did not think the fit would be so tight.

I want a tight faellow like you, and you shall have a fair percentage.

Charmides snatched his father's hand and held it tight, for Creon was one of them.

"They can't, if only you'll let me hold you tight enough," I whispered.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-15c., "dense, close, compact," from Middle English thight, from Old Norse þettr "watertight, close in texture, solid," from Proto-Germanic *thenkhtuz (cf. second element in Old English meteþiht "stout from eating;" Middle High German dihte "dense, thick," German dicht "dense, tight," Old High German gidigan, German gediegen "genuine, solid, worthy"), from PIE root *tenk- "to become firm, curdle, thicken" (cf. Irish techt "curdled, coagulated," Lithuanian tankus "close, tight," Persian tang "tight," Sanskrit tanakti "draws together, contracts").

Sense of "drawn, stretched" is from 1570s; meaning "fitting closely" (as of garments) is from 1779; that of "evenly matched" (of a contest, bargain, etc.) is from 1828, American English; that of "drunk" is from 1830; that of "close, sympathetic" is from 1956. Tight-assed "unwilling to relax" is attested from 1903. Tight-laced is recorded from 1741 in both the literal and figurative senses. Tight-lipped is first attested 1876.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TIGHT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.