Antonyms for stroking

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STROKING

Stroking her thin hand, he said, after a pause, "Did Carry ever write to you?"

Stroking his long chin whiskers he took a Bible from his pocket.

Stroking with the stick or a feather is always to be recommended.

Stroking the beard before a person spoke was preparatory to favor.

Stroking Margaret's hair, Jenny looked down at me in my wicker arm-chair.

Stroking his tawny mustache, he concluded brief comment with a short laugh.

Stroking his cheek critically he decided that he wanted shaving, and, cursing him in my heart, I had to comply.

Stroking the cat and sipping his tea, Mr. Walkingshaw conversed pleasantly with his sister.

Stroking the mare's neck, and with a little halt in her voice, "I do not know what we should do without you."

WORD ORIGIN

"act of striking," c.1300, probably from Old English *strac, from Proto-Germanic *straikaz (cf. Middle Low German strek, German streich, Gothic striks "stroke"), related to the verb stracian (see stroke (v.)). The meaning "mark of a pen" is from 1560s; that of "a striking of a clock" is from mid-15c. Sense of "feat, achievement" (e.g. stroke of luck, 1853) first found 1670s; the meaning "single pull of an oar or single movement of machinery" is from 1731. Meaning "apoplectic seizure" is from 1590s (originally the Stroke of God's Hand). Swimming sense is from 1800.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STROKING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.