massage

[ muh-sahzh, -sahj or, esp. British, mas-ahzh ]SEE DEFINITION OF massage
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MASSAGE

For the present he can but prescribe a purgative and a massage of the arm and spine.

It is often the case that some gland is weak and can be strengthened by this massage.

Don't forget the daily massage; it will work wonders in your appearance.

Having once come to massage her, she wished to see him again, retained him.

Automatically she gives him his bath, his massage, his run in the park.

This aids nutrition and because of the massage it aids circulation.

She calmly took a seat on the stairs and proceeded to massage her head.

Electricity is an excellent accessory to massage—but that is another story.

There is, of course, nothing like massage for rubbing things in.

It's a throat and gout place-baths, massage, electricity, and so forth.

WORD ORIGIN

1874, from French massage "friction of kneading," from masser "to massage," possibly from Arabic massa "to touch, feel, handle;" if so, probably picked up in Egypt during the Napoleonic campaign there. Other possibility is that French got it in colonial India from Portuguese amassar "knead," a verb from Latin massa "mass, dough" (see mass (n.1)). Massage parlor first attested 1894, from the start a euphemism for "house of prostitution."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MASSAGE

apply

verbput substance on another
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.