Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ATTRITION

They have not the attrition which wears away the angularities.

Nothing has done us more harm than all this talk about "attrition."

The difficulty was to overcome its susceptibility to attrition.

I say that attrition with confession is necessary: he believes that contrition is necessary.

In what was to a great extent a war of attrition this was a point of some importance.

But attrition of men is only half; there is the question of food and of money.

The rocks are smoothed with the attrition of the alchemy of years.

Attrition and Contrition, as defined at the Council of Trent, 584.

The process of attrition was going forward slowly and surely.

As they had least to win so they have most to lose in a war of taxation and attrition.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, "abrasion, a scraping," from Latin attritionem (nominative attritio), literally "a rubbing against," noun of action from past participle stem of atterere "to wear, rub away," figuratively "to destroy, waste," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + terere "to rub" (see throw (v.)). The earliest sense in English is from Scholastic theology (late 14c.), "sorrow for sin merely out of fear of punishment," a minor irritation, and thus less than contrition. The sense of "wearing down of military strength" is a World War I coinage (1914). Figurative use by 1930.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ATTRITION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.