Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MUTILATION

No mutilation, no gore; just an effacement—prompt and absolute—'there wasn't any.'

And his fate was to be vengeance of a like mutilation of his own fair cheeks!

He was told that his mutilation and imprisonment had been illegal!

Mutilation of a vanquished enemy is common among these Islanders.

Among slaves perjury was punished by mutilation and whipping.

The history of the mutilation is characteristic of the days of the Regency.

My dear fellow, I have no more power to stop that mutilation of my books than you have.

It is said "to the bee itself this mutilation proves fatal."

The danger of atrophy is sufficient reason for the mutilation.

The effigies on the altar-tombs have been singularly preserved from mutilation.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s, in Scots law, "act of disabling or wounding a limb," from Middle French mutilation and directly from Late Latin mutilationem (nominative mutilatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin mutilare "to cut or lop off," from mutilus "maimed," which perhaps is cognate with Greek mytilos "hornless." Of things, "a destroying of unity by damaging or removing a part," from 1630s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MUTILATION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.