Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR THINK OUT

There she now sat herself to think out the monstrous situation that beset her.

He wanted a place to meditate in, walk up and down, think out his sermons.

He wanted to be alone, to think out this matter for himself.

He laid down his pipe to think out that last startling proposition.

It is our custom to think out the consistency of all our doctrines and usages.

With such as are pleased but do not think out, or who listen but do not mend, I can do nothing.

Think out that question, too, in your thinking out, Clorinda.

And then she tumbled back into the pillows to think out her plan.

So I had to lie down beside him again and think out the problem as best I could.

She had seen him somewhere, but where, she was too sleepy to think out.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English þencan "conceive in the mind, think, consider, intend" (past tense þohte, p.p. geþoht), probably originally "cause to appear to oneself," from Proto-Germanic *thankjan (cf. Old Frisian thinka, Old Saxon thenkian, Old High German denchen, German denken, Old Norse þekkja, Gothic þagkjan); Old English þencan is the causative form of the distinct Old English verb þyncan "to seem or appear" (past tense þuhte, past participle geþuht), from Proto-Germanic *thunkjan (cf. German dünken, däuchte). Both are from PIE *tong- "to think, feel" which also is the root of thought and thank. The two meanings converged in Middle English and þyncan "to seem" was absorbed, except for archaic methinks "it seems to me." Jocular past participle thunk (not historical, but by analogy of drink, sink, etc.) is recorded from 1876.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR THINK OUT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.