Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORTISE

Mortise, a hollow in a stone or timber to receive a corresponding projection.

The marks a, b designate the limits, or the length, of the mortise.

A typical form of mallet chiseling is the digging of a mortise, Fig. 76.

Fasten the lock in place, and if there is a strike or face-plate, mark its place and mortise it in.

The width of the mortise is equal to the width of the groove, its length to the width of the tenon.

The operation of cutting the mortise is called dove-tailing.

The joints may be made with dowels, or the mortise and tenon may be used, as desired.

The back posts also have a mortise cut in them at the top for the back board as shown.

In order to get these pieces into place, the mortise in the long post must be made 1/2 in.

The end rails have a mortise in them for the tenons on the ends of the foot boards.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1400, "hole or groove in which something is fitted to form a joint," from Old French mortaise (13c.), possibly from Arabic murtazz "fastened," past participle of razza "cut a mortise in." Cf. Spanish mortaja.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MORTISE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.