prestige

[ pre-steezh, -steej ]SEE DEFINITION OF prestige
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PRESTIGE

Here he had prestige because he was the son of Daniel Bines, organiser and man of affairs.

Do not disturb the prestige which belongs to a distant and unfamiliar power.

The white man's prestige and privileges were invested in him.

By doing so, it simply hampered faith and diminished its own prestige.

And there's the famous name, and the family, and the prestige.

The Balkan War, however, had been a severe blow to his prestige.

For the boatmen of Beirut have not lost their prestige and power.

To reveal his secret would be to destroy the prestige that must accrue to him from exercising it.

She had no intention of allowing to Mrs. Stanley the prestige which belonged to herself.

Amalfi was completely destroyed, and has never regained her prestige.

WORD ORIGIN

1650s, "trick," from French prestige (16c.) "deceit, imposture, illusion" (in Modern French, "illusion, magic, glamour"), from Latin praestigium "delusion, illusion" (see prestigious). Derogatory until 19c.; sense of "dazzling influence" first applied 1815, to Napoleon.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PRESTIGE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.