eclat

[ ey-klah; French ey-kla ]SEE DEFINITION OF eclat
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ECLAT

Well, when we are altogether, I expect my tea party will go off with eclat.

It was almost with a sense of eclat that she ushered him into the library.

They embellish, and have an eclat in their names, but do not come into collision.

My dear lady, it is worth anything if it will make you happy and add to the eclat of the wedding.

The eclat of their reception, and the influence of the bribes, seemed to silence opposition to the scheme.

The eclat which the Moorish caliphs shed upon Spain from the tenth to the thirteenth century is well known.

Thumbelina, the little maid, threw open the door of number seven with eclat.

The prisoners were represented by John Berwick, the engineer, who entered into their defense with much interest and eclat.

I am glad of it, and especially that we closed our war with the eclat of the action at New Orleans.

I sincerely congratulate you on the peace, and more especially on the eclat with which the war was closed.

WORD ORIGIN

1670s, "showy brilliance," from French éclat "splinter, fragment" (12c.), also "flash of brilliance," from eclater "burst out, splinter," from Old French esclater "smash, shatter into pieces," of uncertain origin, perhaps from a West Germanic word related to slit or to Old High German sleizen "tear to pieces; to split, cleave." Extended sense of "conspicuous success" is first recorded in English in 1741.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.