Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GUSTO

Then the great man began to swear, and did it well and fluently, with gusto.

I wish I could tell the third story with half the gusto with which Dawson related it.

The latter ate his supper with gusto, talking all the while with the old woman.

He munched his humble fare with a gusto he had not known for years.

“You may depend upon me in that, my dear sir,” said the minister, with gusto.

The air just poured in between the cracks, and the snow blew in with gusto.

If she had noticed any earnestness in him, it was his relish, his gusto for the whole of life.

She brightened up at this, and I heard her murmur with gusto, "Chocolate-room!"

This was a crucial point, and I saw that Mr. Rogers approached the task with no gusto.

They are so fond of their 'gusto grande,' and their 'ideal beauty that speaks to the soul!'

WORD ORIGIN

1620s, from Italian gusto "taste," from Latin gustus "a tasting," related to gustare "to taste, take a little of," from PIE root *geus- "to taste, choose" (cf. Sanskrit jus- "enjoy, be pleased," Avestan zaosa- "pleasure," Old Persian dauš- "enjoy"), a root that forms words for "taste" in Greek and Latin, but mostly meaning "try" or "choose" in Germanic and Celtic (cf. Old English cosan, cesan "to choose," Gothic kausjan "to test, to taste of," Old High German koston "try," German kosten "taste of"). The semantic development could have been in either direction. In English, guste "organ of taste, sense of taste," is mid-15c., from French.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GUSTO

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.