notoriety

[ noh-tuh-rahy-i-tee ]SEE DEFINITION OF notoriety
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NOTORIETY

Tawell was executed, and the notoriety of the case brought the telegraph into repute.

His notoriety was new enough and narrow enough to please him still.

And yet Audrey's notoriety had won her more friends than she had ever had before.

The notoriety attending the killing of Matt Hall had not been good for Reid.

Both celebrity and notoriety are distinctions to be shunned.

Any notoriety will bring him welcome publicity, and that is all he is looking for.

I was resolved that my future life, my name, his name, should gain a European notoriety.

Paul might bring on notoriety by some fierce, resentful act.

However, it would be wise to avoid undue haste and notoriety.

A bid for popularity, for notoriety: with its consequent financial kudos.

WORD ORIGIN

1590s, from Middle French notoriété or directly from Medieval Latin notorietatem (nominative notorietas), from notorius "well-known" (see notorious).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NOTORIETY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.