Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCANDAL

He was not by any means an ideal monk, but he was equally far from being a scandal.

We can't afford any scandal, so we're going to settle at your own terms.

"It is not that there will be scandal," replied Father Antoine.

No: there should be no scandal at Long Barton,—at least not while she had to stay in it.

We do not pretend to conceal from you the fact that we are anxious to avoid all publicity, all scandal.

If we are to speak of scandal, I must have leave to balance my account with you.

Make neither commotion nor scandal, and await your opportunity.

If it had been possible, she would have concealed it like a scandal.

But it is necessary for me, for my honor, to prevent the scandal of her inconstancy.

All at once I saw that I myself must bear the brunt of this scandal.

WORD ORIGIN

1580s, "discredit caused by irreligious conduct," from Middle French scandale (12c.), from Late Latin scandalum "cause for offense, stumbling block, temptation," from Greek skandalon "a trap or snare laid for an enemy," in New Testament, metaphorically as "a stumbling block, offense;" originally "trap with a springing device," from PIE *skand- "to leap, climb" (see scan (v.); cf. also slander (n.), which is another form of the same word).

Attested from early 13c., but the modern word likely is a reborrowing. Meaning "malicious gossip," also "shameful action or event" is from 1590s; sense of "person whose conduct is a disgrace" is from 1630s. Scandal sheet "sensational newspaper" is from 1939. Scandal-monger is from 1702.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SCANDAL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.