Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ABOMINATION

That would be frightful, he could not suffer such an abomination.

He wears sandals and has discarded the abomination of starched linen.

The cultivation of the silk-worm is in itself an abomination.

The abomination of desolation raised its voice to heaven: let it cease.

Yes, I reject life; I say that the death of mankind is better than abomination.

May he drag them to hell by their feet, with their noses trailing in their abomination!'

You're only a child, you've made a mint of money out of this present abomination.

No doubt he wanted to be done with that abomination as quickly as possible.

The ages of Art have always been the ages of abomination, Signora.

I see, but I hope you will not weep in my carriage, for all sadness is an abomination to me.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., "abominable thing or action;" late 14c., "feeling of disgust, hatred, loathing," from Old French abominacion "abomination, horror, repugnance, disgust" (13c.), from Latin abominationem (nominative abominatio) "abomination," noun of action from past participle stem of abominari "shun as an ill omen," from ab- "off, away from" (see ab-) + omin-, stem of omen (see omen). Meaning intensified by folk etymology derivation from Latin ab homine "away from man," thus "beastly."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ABOMINATION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.