Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REVULSION

The revulsion accentuated her enjoyment of the picturesque aspects of the scene.

The revulsion of feeling, the unspeakable horror, the remorse, was more than I could bear.

In the revulsion of grief, he turned almost with resentment upon Hamish.

In the first revulsion of feeling, I was perhaps unjust to my associates.

"I'll come with you, Gaspare," she said, with a revulsion of feeling.

All that was to come later, with a fresh access of revulsion and disgust.

And then revulsion took me, suddenly and without any cause or warning.

Of that thought, coming, too, in revulsion to all his late self-gratulations!

What might not be anticipated from a revulsion of sentiment in a people like this?

What revulsion could it be that so suddenly overwhelmed her?

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, as a medical term, from Middle French revulsion (16c.) or directly from Latin revulsionem (nominative revulsio) "a tearing off, act of pulling away," noun of action from past participle stem of revellere "to pull away," from re- "away" (see re-) + vellere "to tear, pull," from PIE *wel- "to tear, pull." The meaning "sudden reaction of disgust" is first attested 1816.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR REVULSION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.