Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PREJUDICES

Mr. Paine did not admire Mrs. Davis, and was not likely to be influenced by her prejudices.

He had a dislike to that country, and I grew up in his prejudices.

She had come to believe almost his theory of the future, since it was not repugnant to her prejudices.

He was not the man to defer in that way to the prejudices of others.

Locke, yielding to the prejudices of the time, took the same ground.

For she, too, is a philosopher, and is therefore just as free from prejudices as we are.

Don't take so heavily my mother's partiality and prejudices.

We expected a sweeping revision of our habits, our prejudices, our conventions.

More is as free as Plato from the prejudices of his age, and far more tolerant.

He had, momentarily, forgotten his grandfather and the latter's prejudices.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "despite, contempt," from Old French prejudice "prejudice, damage" (13c.), from Medieval Latin prejudicium "injustice," from Latin praeiudicium "prior judgment," from prae- "before" (see pre-) + iudicium "judgment," from iudex (genitive iudicis) "a judge" (see judge (v.)). Meaning "injury, physical harm" is mid-14c., as is legal sense "detriment or damage caused by the violation of a legal right." Meaning "preconceived opinion" (especially but not necessarily unfavorable) is from late 14c. in English.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.