Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MOVE OVER

I am going to move over near the scene of the last disappearance.

Diane was about to move over to investigate, but Tresler restrained her.

The carriage door was shut back, and they began to move over the green.

But if Fuller can move over here tomorrow, it will help things a lot.

Perhaps now he will resign, rent the ranch, and move over here.

Still, as long as I could move over the ground, I determined to persevere.

"Artie, move over into the field and to their right," he said.

Take for example the waves that move over the surface of water (Fig. 316).

We might move over to the St. Regis and take the bridal suite.

He started to move over to the object, but Mr. Holton called him back.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., from Anglo-French mover, Old French movoir "to move, get moving, set out; set in motion; introduce" (Modern French mouvoir), from Latin movere "move, set in motion; remove; disturb" (past participle motus, frequentative motare), from PIE root *meue- "to push away" (cf. Sanskrit kama-muta "moved by love" and probably mivati "pushes, moves;" Lithuanian mauti "push on;" Greek ameusasthai "to surpass," amyno "push away").

Intransitive sense developed in Old French and came thence to English, though it now is rare in French. Meaning "to affect with emotion" is from c.1300; that of "to prompt or impel toward some action" is from late 14c. Sense of "to change one's place of residence" is from 1707. Meaning "to propose (something) in an assembly, etc.," is first attested mid-15c. Related: Moved; moving.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MOVE OVER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.