Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PUT THROUGH

Also, your garments are as wrinkled as though you'd been put through a wringer.

Oh, we put through one of Mr. Colton's little trades for him, that's all.

The officer stepped to a wall phone and put through, a call.

These may be put through alternately, or mixed as you grind.

I had got on to some bets he had put through with the aid of his dirty commissioners.

If a pin is put through a lamp cord, a fuse is likely to blow out.

We have put through one winter without a man in the house, and can again.

I expect now that the matter will be put through almost at once.

Guess if they had lived I'd been put through college and all the rest of it.

He couldn't have opened up freer if he'd been put through the third degree.

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English *putian, implied in putung "instigation, an urging," literally "a putting;" related to pytan "put out, thrust out" (of eyes), probably from a Germanic stem that also produced Danish putte "to put," Swedish dialectal putta; Middle Dutch pote "scion, plant," Dutch poten "to plant," Old Norse pota "to poke."

Meaning "act of casting a heavy stone overhead" (as a trial of strength) is attested from c.1300. Obsolete past tense form putted is attested 14c.-15c. To put down "end by force or authority" (a rebellion, etc.) is from c.1300. Adjective phrase put out "angry, upset" is first recorded 1887; to put out, of a woman, "to offer oneself for sex" is from 1947. To put upon (someone) "play a trick on, impose on" is from 1690s. To put up with "tolerate, accept" (1755) was originally to put up, as in "to pocket." To put (someone) on "deceive" is from 1958.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PUT THROUGH

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.