Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HEAVE

Heave the hussy up to her anchor, Mr. Leach, when we will cast an eye to her moorings.

But they need a fellow to heave mud, so they put up with him.

She was quite flushed, and her bodice, generally so still and lifeless, began to heave.

I'll heave up my commission and you pay her the fifteen hundred.

You have never seen the mighty deep, and the storms that heave and swell in it.

She had a deckload of it, and she'd heave it overboard every time the wind changed.

I was fairly sure of my soundings, but it don't do no harm to heave the lead.

"Heave that muck overboard," he ordered some of those who stood idling in the waist.

For an instant that foam of white faces seemed to heave before him.

Only the heave of her bosom betrayed the agitation under which she was labouring.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English hebban "to lift, raise; lift up, exalt" (class VI strong verb; past tense hof, past participle hafen), from Proto-Germanic *hafjan (cf. Old Norse hefja, Dutch heffen, German heben, Gothic hafjan "to lift, raise"), from PIE *kap-yo-, from root *kap- "to grasp" (see capable).

Related to Old English habban "to hold, possess." Intransitive use by c.1200. Meaning "to throw" is from 1590s. Sense of "retch, make an effort to vomit" is first attested c.1600. Related: Heaved; heaving. Nautical heave-ho was a chant in lifting (c.1300, hevelow).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HEAVE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.