Synonyms for balloon

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BALLOON

We are always, metaphorically, going up or coming down in a balloon.

The first balloon ascent was made from this little town in 1783.

Our journey must now be compared to the descent from cloud-land in a balloon.

We was used to the balloon now and not afraid any more, and didn't want to be anywheres else.

Well, up in a balloon there ain't any of that, and it's the darlingest place there is.

Who is going to say whether an applicant is competent to pilot a balloon or airship?

This balloon is a good enough reason it could happen, I should reckon.

The balloon was then to the right of the station, and far from the amiable station-master.

There is a carriage for you and these gentlemen, and another for the body of the balloon.

I saw only the lower end of our balloon, which was overhanging its base, all loose and baggy.

WORD ORIGIN

1570s, "a game played with a large inflated leather ball," from Italian pallone "large ball," from palla "ball," from a Germanic source akin to Langobardic palla (from Proto-Germanic *ball-, from PIE *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell;" see bole) + -one, suffix indicating great size.

Perhaps also borrowed in part from French ballon (16c.), altered (after balle) from Italian pallone. It also meant the ball itself (1590s), which was batted back and forth by means of large wooden paddles strapped to the forearms. In 17c., it also meant "a type of fireworks housed in a pasteboard ball" (1630s) and "round ball used as an architectural ornament" (1650s). Acquired modern meaning after Montgolfier brothers' flights, 1783. As a child's toy, it is attested from 1848; as "outline containing words in a comic engraving" it dates from 1844. Also cf. -oon.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BALLOON

aircraft

nounairplane
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.