balance

[ bal-uhns ]SEE DEFINITION OF balance

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BALANCE

I afterward sold their horse, and sent them the balance of the proceeds.

To make the balance even you have twenty years still to serve.'

What can be done to balance the cost of foods used in a meal?

He had weighed himself in the balance, and found himself wanting.

His mind at this period was evidently shaken in some degree from its balance.

He swung off, got his balance, and ran swiftly down the platform.

She looked at him, as if her life lay in the balance of what she might read in his face.

At the lowest mark, the balance will be even, and there'll be no obligation at all.

If so, let me know the balance that I owe you, when we next meet.

Not that I do not leave a balance to be settled one day, Pecksniff.'

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., "apparatus for weighing," from Old French balance (12c.) "balance, scales for weighing," also in the figurative sense; from Medieval Latin bilancia, from Late Latin bilanx, from Latin (libra) bilanx "(scale) having two pans," possibly from Latin bis "twice" + lanx "dish, plate, scale of a balance." The accounting sense is from 1580s; the meaning "general harmony between parts" is from 1732; sense of "physical equipoise" is from 1660s. Balance of power in the geopolitical sense is from 1701. Many figurative uses are from Middle English image of the scales in the hands of personified Justice, Fortune, Fate, etc.; e.g. hang in the balance (late 14c.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BALANCE

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