Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR COVERS

Shot a damn cock pheasant by mistake, and had to bury the thing in my own covers.

(b) How should jars, covers, and rubbers be treated in this method?

One common grave, according to Garrick, covers the actor and his art.

These pies are always made with covers, and should be eaten warm.

This would always scare me so that I would bury my head in the covers and shake.

The covers were electrified and clung to him like tissue to rubbed amber.

These, tightly flattened, were the sole contents of the covers.

I hope that the next dozen covers do not have blue backgrounds.

She turns her face to the pillow and covers it with a soft, white arm.

Without waiting for a reply, she removed one of the covers of the heater.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-12c., from Old French covrir (12c., Modern French couvrir) "to cover, protect, conceal, dissemble," from Late Latin coperire, from Latin cooperire "to cover over, overwhelm, bury," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + operire "to close, cover" (see weir). Related: Covered; covering. Military sense is from 1680s; newspaper sense first recorded 1893; use in football dates from 1907. Betting sense is 1857. OF horses, as a euphemism for "copulate" it dates from 1530s. Covered wagon attested from 1745.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.