vacuum

[ vak-yoom, -yoo-uh m, -yuh m ]SEE DEFINITION OF vacuum

Synonyms for vacuum

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Antonyms for vacuum

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR VACUUM

As for Philip, all seemed a mere negation; there was a vacuum where his place had been.

There were only a Ruhmkorff coil and Crookes (vacuum) tube and the man himself.

His first search was for a durable filament which would burn in a vacuum.

Plato affirms, almost in so many words, that nature abhors a vacuum.

Yes, it must be that this land is a vacuum, such as I read of when I was a girl in school.

They seemed to lie in a vacuum, in the very hollow of the storm.

A place from which the air is practically all pumped out is called a vacuum.

The vacuum keeps any conducted heat from getting out of the bottle or into it.

But, as you know, radiant heat can flash right through a vacuum.

The air from all sides rushes into the vacuum and collides there; then it bounces back.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, "emptiness of space," from Latin vacuum "an empty space, void," noun use of neuter of vacuus "empty," related to vacare "be empty" (see vain). Properly a loan-translation of Greek kenon, literally "that which is empty." Meaning "a place emptied of air" is attested from 1650s. Vacuum tube is attested from 1859. Vacuum cleaner is from 1903; shortened form vacuum (n.) first recorded 1910.

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.