Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BATH

I was struck with the order of the bath: also the scimetary of the apartments.

Surely those are not the steps that lead down toward the bath?

Dick would be content if she went about in raiment made of dusters and bath towels.

On her way there she had overtaken Robin's wife wheeling Robin in a bath chair.

He ought to get her a proper servant and a man for the garden and the bath chair.

But then--How seductive a subject is eighteenth-century Bath!

Give me a few minutes to take a bath and step into my clothes and then I'll be on the job.

The unwounded hurried back to camp to get breakfast and a bath.

After the departure of the sultani Kingozi took a bath and changed his clothes.

When did a rheumatic ploughman have recourse to Bath or Buxton?

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bæð "immersing in water, mud, etc.," also "quantity of water, etc., for bathing," from Proto-Germanic *batham (cf. Old Norse bað, Middle Dutch bat, German bad), from PIE root *bhe- "to warm" (cf. Latin fovere "to foment") + Germanic *-thuz suffix indicating "act, process, condition" (cf. birth, death). Original sense was of heating, not immersing in water. The city in Somerset, England (Old English Baðun) was so called from its hot springs. Bath salts attested from 1875 (Dr. Julius Braun, "On the Curative Effects of Baths and Waters").

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BATH

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.