prejudice

[ prej-uh-dis ]SEE DEFINITION OF prejudice

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PREJUDICE

The mate had done what he could to prejudice the captain against the boy he hated.

But he may prejudice his father against you, and get you discharged.

"You hit him," cried Chip, forgetting his prejudice for a moment.

But I have never consulted the popular any more than the sectarian, Prejudice.

Heaven protect me from a prejudice so unworthy of my reason!

She was then pleased to charge me with prepossession and prejudice.

There may be some people who have a prejudice against the bagpipes.

It would be a poor thing to gratify a prejudice against him.

So you came with a prejudice, you know, Miss Graham, and are not a fair witness.'

He will let it out by and by—I only hope he will not prejudice you against me.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "despite, contempt," from Old French prejudice "prejudice, damage" (13c.), from Medieval Latin prejudicium "injustice," from Latin praeiudicium "prior judgment," from prae- "before" (see pre-) + iudicium "judgment," from iudex (genitive iudicis) "a judge" (see judge (v.)). Meaning "injury, physical harm" is mid-14c., as is legal sense "detriment or damage caused by the violation of a legal right." Meaning "preconceived opinion" (especially but not necessarily unfavorable) is from late 14c. in English.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PREJUDICE

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